November 2009 Edition

Department of Computer Science and Engineering News
ABET Update
Rada Mihalcea receives UNT Research Award
Network Security Lab's Fall 2009 News
CSE hosts NACLO — North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad
Dr. Armin Mikler is Program Co-Chair
Convergence Technology Center grant renewed for 3 years
CSE and EE Department Faculty receive Undergraduate Research Grant
Conference on Information Technology Workshop presented
Student News
CSE Programming Team News — UNT Team 1 invited to ACM World Finals in China
Santi Phithakkitnukoon defends his dissertation
Kino Coursey defends his PhD dissertation
Advisors Corner - Course Rotations and Prerequisites
Graduating Graduate Students invited to Exit Interview on December 4
All Exit Surveys are online this semester
Spring 2010 CSE Courses
CSCE 3410: PHP Programming
CSCE 4890: Undergraduate Research Opportunity
CSCE 4890: iPhone Development Directed Study
CSCE 5230: Methods of Numerical Computations
College of Engineering News
Texas BEST needs volunteers December 4 and 5
National Society of Black Engineers at CENG
CENG Homecoming Fun

Greetings from the CSE Chair

Dr. Ian Parberry, Interim Chairman

Dear CSE Students,

Before the end of the Fall 2009 semester, I want to share with you the news in our CSE department. ABET visited us in October and they will inform us of our accreditation status for the B.S. in Computer Science program in Spring 2010. Congratulations to CSE faculty member, Rada Mihalcea, for receiving the UNT Early Career Award for Research and Creativity. She was the only College of Engineering faculty member to receive an award from the UNT Office of Research and Economic Development.

Congratulations to our CSE Programming Teams. UNT Team 1 consisting of Daniel Hooper, Robert Mitchell-Burke and James Pascoe has been invited to the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest World Finals in Harbin, China from February 1-6, 2010. This team placed 2nd in the 2009 ACM South Central Regional Programming Competition in early November. Earlier in the semester, the UNT programming team consisting of Wyatt Chastain, Robert Mitchell-Burke and James Pascoe finished in the top ten of the IEEEXtreme 3.0 programming competition. More than 700 teams from universities in 40 countries and the ten Regions of IEEE participated in this competition. Please read below other news from our CSE department, including what is happening in our Network Security Lab.

If you are a graduate student who will graduate in December, please see the article below inviting you to meet with Dr. Bill Buckles, our graduate coordinator, for a graduate exit interview. To the undergraduate students who are graduating this semester, you should have received a letter of congratulations from me along with instructions for taking our online exit interview. Your comments at the end of your degree are valuable to us because we use them to improve our CSE programs.

For students in our undergraduate program, you can also help improve our CSE program by completing the exit surveys for each of your classes. The Undergraduate Coordinator, Dr. Robert Akl, and the Undergraduate Committee review these exit surveys every semester. We appreciate the feedback we receive from our students about our Computer Science and Engineering program.

Finally, I wish you the best of luck with your work at the end of this semester. I hope you are looking forward to your CSE classes in Spring 2010.

Ian Parberry
Professor and Interim Chair

Department of Computer Science and
Engineering News
 

ABET Update

ABET Logo

In early October, the Department of Computer Science and Engineering was visited by a team of evaluators from ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) to evaluate the B.S. in Computer Science program. While they were here, they met with CSE students, faculty members, the Dean of the College of Engineering, other UNT department chairs, and senior administrators at UNT.

Thanks to all the faculty and students who participated in the discussions. The visit went very well. ABET will notify us of their final decision by Spring 2010. 

Rada Mihalcea receives UNT Research Award

Research Awards Reception
Research Awards Reception: (L-R) Wendy Wilkins, Provost and Vice-President for Academic Affairs; Gretchen Bataille, UNT President; Rada Mihalcea, CSE Associate Professor; and Vish Prasad, Vice President for Research and Economic Development.

The UNT Office of Research and Economic Development recognized the contributions of faculty who excel in their research, scholarly, and creative endeavors by instituting the UNT Research and Creativity Awards in Fall 2009. These faculty members received their awards at the annual UNT Research Reception on November 2, 2009.

Rada Mihalcea, Associate Professor for the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, received the UNT Early Career Award for Research and Creativity. This award recognizes faculty members in their first ten years in a full-time faculty appointment whose research or creative endeavors have been truly outstanding.

The other award recipients are Prof. Kent Chapman, Biology, who received the UNT Research Leadership Award; Prof. Harlan Butt, College of Visual Arts and Design, who won the UNT Creative Impact Award; Prof. Gerald Knezek, Learning Technologies, who received the UNT Competitive Funding Award; Prof. Angela Wilson, Chemistry, who won the UNT Teacher-Scholar Award; and Prof. Paolo Grigolini, Physics, who received the Decker Scholar Award.

Congratulations to Rada Mihalcea and all the other award winners. 

Network Security Lab's Fall 2009 News

NSL Members
NSL members (L-R): Mohamed Issadeen Mohamed Fazeen, Paul Sroufe, Vikram Chandrasekaran, Dr. Zuoming Wang, Dr. Ram Dantu, Enkh-Amgalan Baatarjav, Kalyan Pathapati Subbu, Neeraj Gupta, Santi Phithakkitnukoon, Brett McCormick, and Huiqi Zhang.

Dr. Ram Dantu's NSL has been driven by several research projects in different areas including mobile computing, context-aware computing, social computing, privacy in online social networks, and security in VoIP networks. Here are some highlights of NSL:

Santi Phithakkitnukoon has successfully defended his dissertation entitled "Inferring Social and Internal Context using a Mobile Phone" on October 1, 2009 for his Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering. Santi has a paper entitled "Mobile Social Closeness and Similarity in Calling Patterns" accepted for publication in the proceedings of IEEE CCNC'10 Conf. in Las Vegas, NV. He also has another paper entitled "Mobile Social Group Sizes and Scaling Ratio" published in October 2009 by AI and Society - Springer Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Communication. Santi will join MIT SENSEable City Lab as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in February 2010.

Paul Sroufe has defended his thesis entitled "E-Shape Analysis" on October 23, 2009 for his M.S. in Computer Science. A paper entitled "Email Shape Analysis" authored by Paul, Santi, Dr. Dantu, and Dr. Cangussu (UT-Dallas) has been named one of the best three papers at the International Conference on Distributed Computing and Networking (ICDCN 2010), Kolkata, India. The paper will be presented by Dr. Dantu in January 2010.

Huiqi Zhang, Ph.D. candidate, is working on social networks modeling and focusing on quantifying social relationships based on call detail records. His paper "Quantifying reciprocity in social networks" has been published in the proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Social Computing Workshop on Social Mobile Web. He presented this paper at the conference in Vancouver, Canada on August 29-31, 2009.

Mohamed Issadeen Mohamed Fazeen, Ph.D. candidate in CSE, is currently doing research in Online Social Networks where he is focusing on relationship strength in social networks.

Enkh-Amgalan Baatarjav, Ph.D. student in CSE, is currently a teaching assistant. Enkh-Amgalan has research interest in privacy in online social networks. He has a paper entitled "Are You My Friend?" accepted at IEEE CCNC'10 conference in Las Vegas. He will present his paper in January 2010.

Kalyan Pathapati Subbu, Ph.D. student in CSE, has been doing research in mobile computing in which he is developing signal processing and multi sensor fusion algorithms for data obtained from in-built sensors on mobile phones. His recent publications include "iKnow Where You Are!" at SocialCom 2009, "SFRP:A Selective Flooding based routing protocol for Clustered Wireless Sensor Networks" at IEEE RWS 2010, and "Confounded Factors effects on battery life in Wireless Sensor Networks" at NISSC 2009. He has recently received the Texas Public Education Grant from UNT (TPEG).

Neeraj Gupta, Ph.D. student, is working on Next Generation 911 system. The system incorporates new telecommunications technologies of Voice over IP and he is trying to study the problems that it creates. For example, when a 911 operator receives a call from someone using VoIP, the location of the caller may not be easily accessible. In such a situation, it is hard for emergency responders to help.

Brett McCormick, undergraduate student in Computer Science, is currently working on learning about computer network administration at NSL. He has recently received an award from the NSF called "Advanced Technological Education Student Award for Excellence" while he was in Washington DC. It was for his work with his two-year school, Collin Community College, and the ATE center called Convergence Technology. Brett is also a journalist for the College of Engineering. You can read his blog here.

Nikhil Gupta worked at NSL during summer 2009. He was involved in online social networking project with Enkh-Amgalan Baatarjav and Aliasgar Amin with whom he wrote a paper entitled "Are You My Friend?" which will be presented at IEEE CCNC'10 conference. He received his B.E. in Operations Research from Columbia University, NY. He is currently in the M.S. program in Operations Research at Cornell University, NY. 

CSE hosts NACLO — North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad

NACLO
NACLO 2009: Students prepare for the competition to begin.

The regional competition for the 2010 North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad will be hosted by the Department of Computer Science and Engineering on February 4, 2010. NACLO is an educational competition in Computational Linguistics, the science of designing computer algorithms to solve linguistic problems. It challenges students to develop strategies for tackling problems in real languages and formal symbolic systems.

Rada Mihalcea, Associate Professor, will supervise this event. For more information about this competition, see http://lit.csci.unt.edu/index.php/NACLO_2010

Dr. Armin Mikler is Program Co-Chair

Armin Mikler

Dr. Armin Mikler has been named the Program Co-Chair for the ACM International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (ACM-BCB 2010) which will be held August 2-4, 2010 in Niagara Falls, NY. Following the success of the International Joint Conference on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology and Intelligent Computing (IJCBS'09) which was held in Shanghai, China in August 2009, ACM has taken over the IJCBS conference and changed this conference to be ACM International Conference On Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (ACM-BCB). ACM-BCB will be ACM's annual conference starting in 2010.

Through ACM-BCB conferences, ACM hopes to build the bioinformatics and computational biology community and establish an ACM Special Interest Group in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (SIGBCB). A community meeting will be held during the ACM-BCB2010 conference at Niagara Falls to assess and develop the support for forming the ACM SIGBCB. For more information, go to http://www.cse.buffalo.edu/ACM-BCB2010/index.html

Convergence Technology Center grant renewed for 3 years

(L-R) David Keathly and Congressman Frank Lucas (R-Okla.)
(L-R) David Keathly and Congressman Frank Lucas (R-Okla.)

The NSF ATE grant for the Convergence Technology Center which develops programs and curriculum for Unified Networking, Green IT, mobile devices and related topics to share with other community colleges and universities across the U.S. UNT is a partner in the CTC along with El Centro College and Collin College. The Center also currently supports approximately 13 mentored colleges with an additional 21 to be added over the next 3 years. The renewal grant is for approximately $1.56 million over the three years. The CTC is beginning its ninth year of operation. David Keathly is the UNT Co-PI for the CTC program, with other faculty including Ryan Garlick participating in curriculum development and related activities.

Mr. Keathly also attended the recent NSF ATE PI Conference in Washington, DC in support of this program. During the conference, he had an opportunity to meet with Congressman Frank Lucas (R - Okla.) who is a member of the House Science and Technology Committee (and Mr. Keathly's former college friend).

For more pictures of Mr. Keathly's trip, visit http://www.cse.unt.edu/site/node/256 in our Media Gallery. 

CSE and EE Department Faculty receive Undergraduate Research Grant

A group of faculty from the CSE and EE departments in the College of Engineering was recently awarded a UNT internal Undergraduate Research grant of $8,000 to support a project developing a micro-UAV (unmanned air vehicle) capable of carrying small payloads such as cameras and GPS units for surveillance and surveying type activities.

Students from both departments will work together on the project as part of the Senior Capstone project courses in Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering Undergraduate programs. The following faculty members from CSE are participating: Robert Akl and David Keathly. The following faculty members from Electrical Engineering are participating: Kamesh Namuduri, Oluwayomi Adamo, Shengli Fu, Zinrong Li, and Parthasarathy Guturu. 

Conference on Information Technology Workshop presented

David Keathly and Ryan Garlick
CSE Advisors David Keathly and Ryan Garlick

Dr. Ryan Garlick and David Keathly recently presented a workshop on "Mobile Devices in the Classroom" at the annual League for Innovation Conference on Information Technology in Detroit, Michigan. The conference is attended by community college and university faculty from across the country. The workshop provided participants with an opportunity to try various social networking and online mobile tools that are useful to encourage student participation, as well as providing an overview of mobile device applications development tools for the iPhone, Blackberry and Android based handsets. 

Student News
 

CSE Programming Team News — UNT Team 1 invited to ACM World Finals in China

CSE Programming Team
CSE Programming Teams (L-R) back: Coach Michael Mohler, Daniel Piers, Russell Yermal, Stuart Callison. Front: Daniel Hooper, James Pascoe, Robert Mitchell-Burke

UNT Team 1 consisting of Daniel Hooper, Robert Mitchell-Burke and James Pascoe has been invited to the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest World Finals in Harbin, China from February 1-6, 2010. This team placed 2nd in the 2009 ACM South Central Regional Programming Competition at East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma on November 6-7, 2009. Two teams of CSE students attended the competition. The UNT 2 Team members were Daniel Piers, Russell Yermal and Stuart Callison. Both teams were coached by graduate student and former programming team member, Michael Mohler.

Another programming competition, IEEEXtreme 3.0, was held on October 24, 2009. More than 700 teams from universities in 40 countries and the ten Regions of IEEE participated. The UNT programming team consisting of Robert Mitchell-Burke, James Pascoe, and Wyatt Chastain finished in the top ten. More details can be found here. Congratulations to our CSE programmers on both of these competitions! 

Santi Phithakkitnukoon defends his dissertation

Santi Phitakkitnukoon
(L-R) Phil Sweany, Ram Dantu, Santi Pithakkitnukoon, João Cangussu, and Parthasarathy Guturu

Santi Phithakkitnukoon defended his dissertation "Inferring Social and Internal Context using a Mobile Phone" on October 1, 2009. His major professor was Ram Dantu, Associate Professor in the UNT Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Other members on his committee included Phil Sweany, Associate Professor in the UNT Department of Computer Science and Engineering; Parthasarathy Guturu, Assistant Professor in the UNT Department of Electrical Engineering; and João Cangussu, Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Texas at Dallas. Santi will join MIT SENSEable City Lab as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in February 2010. 

Kino Coursey defends his PhD dissertation

Kino Coursey
(L-R) William Moen, Rada Mihalcea, Kino Coursey, Paul Tarau

The most exciting news in the Language and Information Technologies group is a new doctor: Kino Coursey successfully defended his Ph.D. thesis on October 23 on "The Value of Everything: Ranking and Association with Encyclopedic Knowledge." His committee consisted of major professor Rada Mihalcea and committee members CSE Associate Professor, Paul Tarau; William Moen, Associate Professor of the UNT School of Library and Information Sciences; Doug Lenat, founder of the CYC project and the President of Cycorp and Michael Witbrock, Vice President of Research at Cycorp. 

Advisors Corner - Course Rotations and Prerequisites

As we enter the registration period for the Spring semester, many of you have experienced conflicts and issues with course offerings and course prerequisites at a higher rate than in the past. Some of these problems are related to changing focus on policies at the University, College and Department levels. Note that I said change of focus, not change of policies. Course prerequisites are listed in the UNT Course catalog and on the department academic program guides you received at your UNT orientation. The Department has also maintained a course rotation schedule for many years that defines which courses are offered during each semester on a standard basis. In the past several years, a number of these policies have been relaxed for a variety of reasons, especially in new programs to help new courses enroll sufficient students and other reasons. As one would expect, these policies cannot be relaxed forever, and those relaxations should never be expected to continue indefinitely for planning purposes.

Changes in university policies regarding minimum course size have also required new approaches to filling classes and assigning faculty to classes. The university now requires an undergraduate class to have at least 12 students enrolled by the end of early registration (not regular registration) or it is subject to cancellation. This means you need to register early if you want to make certain your classes are not cancelled.

So what can you expect in the future? Here are some guidelines:

  1. Expect that all classes will require completion of all prerequisites in order to enroll.

  2. Courses will be offered according to the Departmental course rotation schedule. So check this out on the department website, or use the sample course schedule in the catalog as a guide.

  3. Expect low enrollment courses to be cancelled.

This means you must plan carefully in order to graduate in a timely fashion. Your advisors can help, but ultimately your progress is your responsibility. Exceptions to the above may occur if sufficient need can be demonstrated, but require not only a minimum group of students, but also the availability of classroom, faculty and teaching assistant resources as well as the approval of the department leadership. 

Graduating Graduate Students invited to Exit Interview on December 4

Dr. Bill Buckles, Graduate Studies Coordinator, invites all graduate students who are graduating this semester to come to an Exit Meeting on Friday, December 4, at 1 p.m. in the CSE department's main conference room, F223. To ensure the quality of our program and to determine how it should be changed and improved, we seek information from a number of sources including our recent graduates, our advisory board, area employers, and most importantly, from you, our current students. You have a unique perspective that is crucial to this effort. Dr. Buckles looks forward to meeting with our graduate students who will be leaving us this semester and getting their feedback about their experience in our CSE department. 

All Exit Surveys are online this semester

Exit Survey
Turn this unique ticket into your instructor when you complete the online Exit Survey.

If you have taken an undergraduate CSE class, you know at the end of semester the instructor has asked you to complete an exit survey about the course. After Thanksgiving, it will be time to complete those exit surveys again. The exit surveys give you an opportunity to evaluate how effective the course has been in helping you achieve the desired outcomes for that course. All of these exit surveys will be online this semester.

Each undergraduate course has outcomes, which are measurable skills or activities that students should achieve by the end of the course. The outcomes of all the courses in the curriculum are designed to ensure that you will have mastered the objectives of the degree by the time you graduate. The course exit survey lets us know how you think you are achieving these outcomes and lets you tell us how you think the course could be improved.

One of the requirements of our accreditation by ABET is that we have a program of continuing assessment and improvement. You have a very important part to play by completing these exit surveys. Thank you for helping to improve our CSE courses.

Thank you for participating and helping to improve our CSE department. 

Spring 2010 CSE Courses
 

CSCE 3410: PHP Programming

PHP

Creating dynamic webpages and web scripting is a hot topic in the industry today, and it is a skill in great demand. One of the most-commonly used programming languages for this task is PHP. The web-oriented PHP Programming Language will be offered this spring session as CSE 3410.001.

The course will discuss the process of developing web-based applications using this language, showing students what it takes to process forms-based data, as well as a variety of programming techniques for the manipulation and storage of both client-oriented data and webpage content. As time permits, more advanced discussions involving AJAX will be included.

This course will be taught by Don Retzlaff. It has been shown that knowledge of PHP dramatically helps students prepare for the software development courses CSCE 4410 and 4420. Be sure and take advantage of this powerful development language and get a head start on the preparation for 4410. 

CSCE 4890: Undergraduate Research Opportunity

Graph Theory

Computer Science and Computer Engineering upper division students interested in learning the ropes concerning academic research in the Computer field are welcome to sign up for 1-3 hours of CSCE 4890 Directed Study with Richard A. Goodrum during Spring 2010. The area of research is Hierarchical Subcommunity Identification via Concurrent Flow Modeling (Graph Theory). You will be introduced to the field, the algorithms, and the research process. You will implement, as a team, a new algorithm to achieve the overall objective: Hierarchical Subcommunity Identification. The group will do data collection and processing as well as collection and study of related articles. A directed study of this nature can be used to fulfill the tech electives for Computer Engineering or advanced electives for Computer Science. 

CSCE 4890: iPhone Development Directed Study

iPhone

Dr. Ryan Garlick will lead a directed study on iPhone development in Spring 2010. This class will involve a significant time investment, considerable outside reading and independent study. It will meet once per week, either Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday during the day. The required prerequisite for this course is CSCE 3110, Data Structures and Algorithms. The preferred perquisite is CSCE 4410, Software Development I. This is a 3 credit hour course and only 6 hours of directed study may be applied to a degree. For more information, contact Dr. Garlick

CSCE 5230: Methods of Numerical Computations

MATLAB

MATLAB is a user-friendly computing environment and powerful programming language designed for scientific and engineering applications. In addition to built-in numerical methods and computer graphics, it includes toolboxes for applications such as signal processing, and simulation. It combines the power of a high-level language with the efficiency of C or Fortran, and has replaced the latter as the primary language for scientific computing. Familiarity with MATLAB is essential to every engineer and computational scientist. This course allows students to earn three semester hours of credit while gaining that familiarity.

The course will cover the fundamentals of floating-point computation and error control, conditioning of problems and stability of methods, direct methods for solving linear systems, polynomial and spline interpolation, Bézier curves, quadrature, ordinary differential equations, and nonlinear equations.

Dr. Robert Renka will be teaching this class on Mondays and Wednesdays at 3:30 p.m. The prerequisites are calculus, linear algebra, and programming. Contact Dr. Renka for more information about this class. 

College of Engineering News
 

Texas BEST needs volunteers December 4 and 5

DC Best
A student competes at DC BEST (Denton County Boosting Engineering, Science, and Technology) in October 2009.

The UNT College of Engineering will host the regional robotics competition known as Texas BEST (Boosting Engineering, Science, and Technology) on December 4 and 5 at the UNT Coliseum. The teams from high schools and middle schools in Texas and New Mexico have advanced from local competitions to this regional championship. About 40 teams comprising 1,000 students will gather at the Super Pit for this robot rumble. Student, faculty and staff volunteers are need to serve as referees, mentors, judges and overall help. If you would like to volunteer for Texas BEST, please contact Dr. Miguel Garcia-Rubio.

BEST aims to inspire students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math through participation in a fun, sports-like competition. The robots, which are built and operated by students, compete to solve a set of tasks established by organizers. Six weeks ago teams received standardized sets of building materials at no cost to be used in constructing a robot that's programmed to collect various items needed for creating "synthetic fuel." Teams are judged on how well their robots are programmed to push buttons or send infrared signals to collect the necessary items needed for creating the mock fuel.

BEST Robotics, Inc. was organized in 1993 by engineers from Texas Instruments. Today more than 10,000 students participate nationwide. Regional championships are held in Texas, Arkansas, and Alabama. For more information about the competition, go to the Texas BEST website at http://www.eng.unt.edu/texasbest/

National Society of Black Engineers at CENG

Black Enginners
Attendance at NSBE meeting in October: (L-R) Thomas Johns, Kismet Iheke, Oluwaseun Adeyemi, Chris Stallings, Kiefier Hunter, Jasmine Breedlove, Bryan Hall, Okafor Uzochukwu, Jonathan Brown
NSBE UNT Logo
NSBE UNT Logo

The National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE, pronounced "nez-bee") has been meeting twice a month on Thursday evenings this semester at Discovery Park. The last meeting of the semester will be held Thursday, December 3, at 7:30 p.m. in DP D215. You are invited to drop by and check them out.

NSBE is partnering with the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
NSBE National Logo
NSBE National Logo
(SHPE) and the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) to conduct Engineering Study Hall sessions on the Main Campus and at Discovery Park.

  • On Mondays, they have Study Hall in Wooten Hall 318 from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.
  • On Thursdays, they have Study Hall in DP B185 from 6 to 7:15 p.m. and DP D215 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. (on Non-Meeting Thursdays).

Here are NSBE's remaining general body meeting days:

  • November 5, 2009
  • November 19, 2009
  • December 3, 2009

NSBE and SHPE will be wrapping gifts at Barnes and Noble's at Golden Triangle Mall between November 27, 2009 and December 24, 2009 to raise funds for the chapter. If you are an excellent gift wrapper and are willing to dedicate your time to wrapping gifts for holiday shoppers, please email Bryan Hall at bryan.hall279@yahoo.com.

SWE will have their Regional Conference at the University of Texas at Dallas, February 5-7, 2010. Because NSBE, SHPE, and SWE are nationally related organizations, you are in encouraged to join all three organizations and maximize your networking opportunities. If you cannot make it to NSBE's Fall Regional Conference or SHPE's National Conference, make sure that you do not miss SWE's Regional Conference. Contact Brittany Caldwell for more information.

On November 12, NSBE's Regional Vice-Chair, Shaney Jackson, presented a leadership workshop at the College of Engineering for UNT students.

A total of 33 UNT students and staff members attended the Fall Regional Conference (FRC) in Tulsa, OK, from October 30 to November 1, 2009. This group included:

  • Rosalyn Smith from the Career Center
  • Tonya Riley from Student Success Programs
  • The Voices of Praise Gospel Choir
  • NSBE Senators Morris Starts and Kiefier Hunter
  • NSBE Secretary Amber Branch
  • NSBE President (and FRC Special Events Coordinator) Bryan Hall
  • NSBE Members Lloyd Spaine and Saheed Oseni

NSBE is making plans to attend the 36th annual NSBE conference March 31-April 4, 2010 in Toronto, Canada, where more than 10,000 black engineering professionals and students will gather around the theme "Engineering a Global Impact."

The mission of NSBE is "to increase the number of culturally responsible Black Engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally, and positively impact the community." Collegiate membership is open to all engineering, math, physical, applied, and computer science majors. Bryan Hall is the president and Dr. Nigel Shepherd is the faculty advisor. For more information, go to http://unt.orgsync.com/org/nsbe

CENG Homecoming Fun

Black Enginners
Having fun with the CENG car at Homecoming 2009

The College of Engineering hosted more than 50 guests at the "tailgating" tent during UNT's Homecoming Weekend in the Mean Green Village on October 17, 2009. CENG departments hosted displays and activities for alumni, students and other visitors to the tent. Alums from a half dozen companies visited with Dean Tsatsoulis and faculty. Student Ambassadors were available to answer questions. The Department of Engineering Technology's nitrogen-powered car was also a hit or rather splash in the mud! A fajita and grilled vegetable buffet pleased the crowd. More than a dozen guests remained for the football game against Florida Atlantic. 

The CSE Student Email Newsletter was assembled and produced by Genene Murphy and Don Retzlaff. It is a publication of the UNT Computer Science and Engineering Department. Contact the department at csenewsletter@unt.edu.

http://www.cse.unt.edu — UNT Computer Science and Engineering Department — November 2009